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Best Projectors for Business and How to Choose a Business Projector

Best Projectors for Business and How to Choose a Business Projector


It depends on the environment you are working with. Are you using it for meetings in a conference room? Are you using it for trade-show tasks? Are you using it for large auditoriums? To begin, you have to determine your audience size. The larger the size, the higher the specifications you need for projectors. There are four things to look for: lumens, quality (resolution), throw ratio, and portability. We should first take a look at lumens, or how bright the projector can project an image.


Brightness and lumens:



For 0 to 30 people:


For a meeting room of 0 to 30 people, and the room is dark with little ambient light, we recommend a projector that is 2000 to 3100 lumens.

For a meeting room of 0 to 30 people, and the room has some light, but not very bright, we recommend a projector that is 3100 to 4000 lumens.

For a meeting room of 0 to 30 people, and the room is very bright, we recommend a projector that is 4000 to 5000 lumens.

For 30 to 100 people:


For a meeting room that has 30 to 100 people, and the room is dark with little ambient light, we recommend a projector that is 3100 to 4000 lumens.

For a meeting room of 30 to 100 people, and the room has some light, but not very bright, we recommend a projector that is 4000 to 5000 lumens.

For a meeting room of 30 to 100 people, and the room is very bright, we recommend a projector that is 5000 to 6000 lumens.

For 100 to 300 people:


For a large area, like a trade show, or auditorium setting, and the room has some light, but not very bright, we recommend a projector that is 5000 to 6000 lumens.

For a large area, like a trade show, or auditorium setting, and the room is bright, we recommend a projector that is 6000 lumens to 8000 lumens.

The theme, as you can see, is to keep the room as dark as possible. The darker the room, the lower the lumens you need for projectors, thereby saving you money.


Quality (resolution):



When we say quality, we mean the native resolution of the projector. Usually, the most important factor is how high the lumens of a projector is. The brightness or lumens of a projector dictates how high a quality an projected image is. Then, the next most important specification is the resolution (aka quality).

The lowest resolution projectors are usually SVGA at 800 x 600 native resolution. You have to look for the important keyword of "native". If the projector specifications does not say "native", the resolution could be interpolated or it could mean that it is possible to get that resolution or be compatible with that resolution. You don't want this. You want the "native" resolution. You want to find out what the native resolution is because that is the highest number of pixels that the projector can get in real terms. So, for example, if you plug are trying to display 1080p (1920 x 1080 pixels) or a XGA output (1024 x 768 pixels) from a computer to the projector with SVGA 800 x 600 native resolution, the projector will take the connection., but the output image will still be 800 x 600. It won't magically turn into 1920 x 1080 or 1024 x 768 (or whatever input you are connecting to the SVGA projector). So, it is important to get the highest native resolution possible, within your budget.

All things being equal (lumens and other specifications), SVGA projectors will be a $100 to $200 cheaper than XGA projectors, and XGA projectors will be $100 to $200 cheaper than WXGA projectors, and WXGA projectors will be $200 to $400 cheaper than 1080p (1920 x 1080 pixels) projectors.

However, you have to keep in mind the lumens count of the projectors. You can get a 1080p projector, but the lumens could be in the low 2000s, and you will get a very sharp picture, but a very dim picture, unless you turn off all the lights and keep the room completely 100% dark. You also have to realize that it takes more light to fill a higher native resolution than a lower resolution.

For example, lets say 2 projectors have a 150W lamp inside each of the 2 projectors. The wattage of a lamp usually will tell you how powerful a projector is, in terms of brightness, but this is not always the case. One 150W projector has SVGA resolution and the second 150W projector has 1080p resolution. Please keep in mind both projectors use the same 150W bulb. Now, this means that the SVGA projector will be much brighter in terms of lumens than the 1080p projector. This is true because the SVGA projector only needs to fill light on 800 x 600 pixels. The 1080p projector needs to fill light on 1920 x 1080 pixels. That is 480,000 pixels for the SVGA projector and 2,073,600 pixels for the 1080 projector, so the 1080p projector requires 4 times more light to achieve the same brightness. This is one way to look at it. In real life, it is not exactly 4 times more light, but you get the point.

1080p projectors are more expensive because they need more wattage for bulbs to get higher brightness relative to SVGA projectors that have fewer pixels to light up.

So, as discussed previously, lumens is always more important than resolution. After you determine the lumens you need, then you should look at the native resolution.

After all, if you get the sharpest 1080p projector, but has only 2000 lumens, you won't be able to use it in a large room setting.

Recommendations for Businesses, Conference Rooms, Presentations, & Trade-Shows:



3,100 Lumens for 0-30 People, Low to Medium Room 4,400 Lumens for 0-150 People, Medium to Bright Room 6,100 Lumens for 30-300 People, Medium to Bright Room 7,100 Lumens for 150+ People, Medium to Bright Room
In Stock, Ready to Ship In Stock, Ready to Ship In Stock, Ready to Ship In Stock, Ready to Ship


Throw Ratio



What is a throw ratio? This specification determines how large of an image size you will get from a specific distance.

This is important.

This also reminds every business person that you have to test out your projector before you start using it. Believe me, many business people have fallen into this trap where they do not test the projectors for the throw distance before carrying them off for important presentations.

Without further ado, the throw ratio is determined by a specification such as:

1.2:1 or a range such as 1.2:1 to 1.5:1.

To start, lets begin with a single throw ratio of 1.2:1 or, to make it simpler: 1.2 to 1 . That is what the ":" in between means (to).

A projector with 1.2:1 1.2 to 1 means that for every 12 inches you set the projector away from the screen, you will get a 10 inch picture size.

So, at 12 feet away, the projector will project a 10 feet wide image size.

You have to note that it is the width (left to right) that is 10 feet. It is not the diagonal measurement. With projection screens, they are usually measured in diagonal size (bottom left to top right), so you have to find out what the display width (left to right) is for the screen. Most of the time, screens' technical specifications will tell you.

Now, if the throw ratio of a projector is a range, such as 1.2:1 ranging to 1.5:1, that means the projector has an optical zoom lens. The zoom lens will allow you to change the image size, without moving the projector. The range of image sizes that can be projected, at a set distance is determined by the throw ratios (1.2:1 ranging to 1.5:1).

So, this means, from 12 feet away, the projector can throw an image that ranges from 8 feet (1.5:1 throw ratio to 10 feet wide (1.2:1 throw ratio).


Size and portability:



In a perfect world, every projector model would be tiny, yet have very high specifications. The rule of thumb is that the higher the specifications, the heavier and bigger the projector.

The strategy then is to choose the right size at the right specification.

Nowadays, the good news is that even for high spec projectors, you get a range of size and portability. As mentioned previously the smaller the size, the more expensive the projector (given everything else being equal). Most portable projectors are around 2lbs to 8lbs. At that range, it is perfectly suitable to carry it like a laptop, on your shoulders, in a carrying case.

If you cannot carry on your shoulders, you can always opt for a rolling luggage or carry-on luggage that you can pull like a professional that you are.

Most projectors nowadays are slightly larger than an average laptop, and twice the height.

You can picture this in your head and you will see that the average business projector is quite definitely okay to carry with you for business trips.

Now that you know that it is not such a chore to carrying a projector around on trips, please look at the other three factors (lumens, resolution, and throw ratio) previously mentioned to determine what projector is the best fit for you.